James Feldkamp | Three Common Methods of Modern-Day Terrorism

James Feldkamp | Three Common Methods of Modern-Day Terrorism

The growing recognition of the threat made the authorities focus more on combating international terrorism, developing strategies and executing plans to eradicate the issue. However, since their ideas and cause – and in the long run, their very existence – is on the verge of collapsing, many terrorist organizations adapted and have evolved in order to survive.
Evolution and adaptation
Terrorists base their operations of inciting violence primarily on their environment. The vintage approach to classic terrorism is when individuals banded together and raided villages, or looted communities. With the rise of the authority of nation-states, terror organizations shifted from simple pillaging to other trends, trying to disrupt governments, breed distrust and fear in the society, and advance their causes. These tactics have grown more complex over the years.
Female suicide bombers
With the continuous development of gunpowder and explosive materials, one of the more common methods that modern-day terrorists use is spreading fear through bombings. Meanwhile, to adapt to the more stringent security measures that authorities place in their areas, this technique took on a twist – using females as suicide bombers.
Female suicide bombings are actually a more recent twist to the classic method, being brought out only in the early 2000s. The first recorded instance of a female suicide bombing is when a 17-year old girl detonated her suicide vest at an Israeli convoy.
Youth agitators
This has been an ideal hotbed for terrorism, targeting the youth, since most of the individuals in this community still retain ideals, and a bit of a rebellious streak. Meanwhile, with the youth groups being the major segment of population in most countries, terror organizations have a large pool of potential recruits. For example, in Muslim communities where there are terror organizations, most of their regulars have recruited from the youth sector, with the training and indoctrination starting from a young age.
Foreign “freedom” fighters
The more recent trend in terror groups, this method is more common in Jihadist groups that target non-Muslim communities. These foreigners relate to the Islamic religious cause, and the “persecution” of non-Muslims. However, lacking with the level of dedication that true jihadists have, these fighters have simpler interests in joining. In a 2010 study, it was found out that some of these foreign fighters join terrorist organizations only for revenge, or just seeking out a thrill.
There are still a number of other tactics that terror groups use to further their cause. Meanwhile, as the methods become more complex, authorities continue to try and eradicate the danger that these groups pose.



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